Burning carbohydrate-rich foods could cause some cancers

How to Enjoy Burnt General adviceMeat and Put Your Health at Risk

According to a recent study, Dutch scientists have found that burning your food may lead to increased risks of cancer, especially in women.

The new study supports current advice which assumes that certain chemicals produced in burnt meat may be a human carcinogen.

According to the study, chemicals produced when cooking foods high in carbohydrates is a potential cause of womb and ovarian cancers. While it was initially found in 2002, the new study indicates, for the first time, a connection between the chemical in a human diet being a cause. So far there is no evidence to suggest the chemical may be causing breast cancers.

Men Aren’t Immune

Women aren’t the only possible victims of over-cooked meat. Men can develop cancers as well.

A burnt buger can produce cancer-causing chemicals. Keep your next cookout risk-free with these tips:

When meat is cooked at high temperatures, heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed. The National Cancer Institute reports these cause cancers in animals — lab rats. It’s not clear yet if humans contract cancer after exposure to HCAs and PAHs.

Experts advise against eating crispy meats. Natalie Azar, MD says that there’s a pretty good chance of increasing the risk of prostate, pancreatic and colorectal cancer.

PAHs are located in cigarette smoke and car exhaust.

Manhattan Physical Exams recommend to follow these tips for cancer-free cookouts:

Marinate

Give the dish a dose of flavor by cooking meats with garlic, fruit-pulp, and vitamin E-rich rubs like chili powder which can reduce HCA production by up to 70%. Cooking the meat in beer decreases HCAs as well.

Trim the Time

Don’t worry. You don’t have to eat pink chicken. Microwave the meat for 60 seconds before cooking to reduce exposure time. If grilling, broiling or pan-frying, turn the heat down. Direct exposure to high temps is the main cause of HCA and PAH produced in meat.

Picky Eater

Charred spots are also hot spots cor carcinogens. If you tend to burn food on the grill, continually flip the meat to limit surface exposure. If a spot is still burnt, just slice if off before serving.

Right Oil

Many commonly used cooking oils can’t stand the heat. Grapefruit-seed oil and soybean oil may mutate at higher temperatures, and this compounds any carcinogenic problems already present. If stir-frying or adding some oil to a marinade, use peanut oil.